9 July 2019

Summer Tips and Warnings

In memory of Max

Scratch & Patch today read a very sad story and we wanted to share this with you to raise awareness of intoxication in dogs in the summer, and the dangers that can happen when they play in water.

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Beware of water intoxication in dogs! 

This is caused by excessive water intake by the dog while playing in the water. Symptoms to look out for are loss of coordination, glazed eyes, lethargy, nausea, vomiting and excessive salivation. … if you suspect your dog is suffering from water intoxication, they need immediate medical attention.

Below is an extract we read on Facebook and wanted to send our sincere condolences the Max’s family

“Yesterday after a day filled with fun, fetch and swimming in Lake Windermere, Myself, Lucy & Tiggy had to say goodbye to our best friend Max.

He collapsed and was rushed to the nearest vets where he was diagnosed immediately with water intoxication and put on drips of sodium, potassium and mannitol to increase his electrolytes and relieve pressure on his brain.

After 7 hours of determination from the vets and nurses, Max was unable to pull through.

Water intoxication is a relatively rare but frequently fatal condition in dogs. At highest risk are dogs that enjoy playing in the water for long stretches.

We are so unbelievably devastated that a simple game of fetch in the water, something we had done a hundred times before, resulted in such a perfect day turning into our worst nightmare.

Water intoxication was something we knew nothing about. At this time of year, so much awareness is spread about not leaving dogs in hot cars but no one ever mentions the hazardous effects of your dog ingesting too much water whilst playing.

We have had to learn the hard way and all we can do now is spread awareness of this terrible condition in the hope that other dog owners are informed.”

Please help by passing on the information to other dogs owners.



Scratch & Patch


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